A control group received no feedback at all. The apartments that received the health-related warnings began using an average of eight percent less power than the control group. If there were kids in the household, apartment dwellers reduced their electricity use by 19 percent, said the study. Apartments that were told about cost savings from using less energy barely changed their habits at all. Researchers said that touting monetary savings may not have worked, in part because electricity in the United States is already fairly inexpensive. “For most people at our field site, the savings for cutting back to using the same as their most efficient neighbor would only be $4 to $6 per month. That’s a fast-food combo meal or a couple of gallons of milk,” said co-author Omar Asensio, a doctoral student studying economics and environmental sciences and engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles.
Health, not money, inspires people to save power – Yahoo News

WKSU News: TREAT Act would expand the scope of the war against opiates

Courtesy of Creative Commons: Angela Doss Download (WKSU Only) In The Region: Health providers are struggling to keep up with the high rate of people addicted to heroin and pain killers. Sen. Sherrod Brown is co-sponsor of legislation that would make it easier for addiction specialists to prescribe certain medications as part of their treatment. One current restriction limits physicians to treat only 30 patients in their first year after certification. Dawn Brumfield is director of Signature Health, a treatment center. She backs Browns home efforts to get whats called The Recovery Enhancement for Addiction Treatment Act passed. LISTEN: Brumfield talks management of prescribers and patients Other options:
WKSU News: TREAT Act would expand the scope of the war against opiates

Advertisements